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Melissa’s Suggestion

December 20, 2011

In response to my post Tarot Without Tarot Cards 1, Melissa asked if I would write about the history of divination with playing cards. (See Comments to that entry.) My initial reaction was that I wouldn’t touch this topic. This is a Tarot blog and I thought there would be other blogs or websites discussing playing card divination I could point Melissa, and anyone else interested in the subject, at.

But if these blogs and websites exist, I can’t find them. There’s information on the ‘Net about how to tell fortunes with playing cards but nothing at all about the history of this kind of cartomancy. Reluctantly, then, I’m taking up Melissa’s suggestion that I write about the history of playing card divination. I have the research to hand, in the form of raw data, and, given time, can put it into some sort of order.

So over the holidays, the blog will be taking a brake from Tarot to look at playing card divination – which impinges somewhat on the Tarot, so we won’t be entirely off topic.

From → playing cards, tarot

4 Comments
  1. Mary K.Greer has gathered some consistent data about playing cards divination history (mixed with tarot)
    http://marygreer.wordpress.com/2008/04/01/origins-of-divination-with-playing-cards/

    • Cher Bertrand,

      Mary Greer has a wonderful website which I read avidly. Her work on the history of making readings by means of playing cards is second to none. But she has little to say in relation to the question I was asked, which was: –

      Would you write something about the history of playing card meanings, how they’ve changed over the years and why they changed?

      That is the area I will be covering, as well as I may; for as I have noted, this isn’t my area of expertise.

      Your own blog (http://du-tarot.blogspot.com/) looks full of good things. I’ve dipped in briefly and will be going back to study it more deeply when I have the time.

      Best wishes,

      Auntie

      • I’m sorry, I sometimes read a bit too quickly and forget my english is far from perfect even for understanding my readings, hence this laconic and rapid reply – which I thought might help.
        I’m really longing to read your writings about that subject anyway and take the opportunity to congratulate you for this excellent blog of yours, which should have been done earlier.

        Yours sincerely,

        Bertrand

      • Cher Bertrand,

        Thank you for your kind praise of my blog.

        As for your misunderstanding of English, your grasp of the language is far better than my grasp of French!

        Of course misunderstandings occur. But it is no great problem where they can be put right. I am glad we understand one another now.

        Best wishes,

        Auntie

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